Cris Forster
s Instruments and Music

 

          Acoustic music is the most difficult music. Building musical instruments from the ground up is an expression of freedom and, therefore, an expression of imagination. Nothing about this art is hewn in stone. The creative builder examines all aspects of musical instrument construction, and on a case-by-case basis decides which traditions to keep, and which to throw out.
 

          I build because the tunings and timbres I want to hear do not exist on store shelves. Robinson Crusoe built because he had no choice. And yet, his creations also had no critics, and so his imagination became his life. Often when I hike through forests or climb mountains, I am reminded that only man knows what time it is. When I enter Crusoe’s world, or when in building an instrument time ceases to exist, I live with the knowledge that success is only a function of thought, work, and patience.
 

          The desire for perfection is the juggernaut of creativity. All my instruments are flawed. A bar may not ring as long as another bar; a canon bridge may be too high or too low; or a tone hole may be too wide or too narrow. I know where all the flaws are, and could find many more. But what is the point? The only thing that matters is to build and to make a music that is sustainable in time. I was born a musician, and have built musical instruments since 1975. In the words of Walt Whitman (1819–1892), “I . . . begin, hoping to cease not till death.”
 

          I also hope that these instruments will inspire others to think critically about acoustic music, and perhaps to build an original instrument or two. One of the happiest moments of my life is to finish a project, step back, and declare in a state of complete surprise, “I’d like to meet the person who built this instrument.”

 

 

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YouTube Just Intonation Music Videos

 

 

 

 

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Kickstarter Article

 

 

 

 

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PTC Mathcad Article

 

 

 

 

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San Francisco Classical Voice Article

 

 

 

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We are pleased to announce that Cris Forster’s book,

 

Musical Mathematics: On the Art and Science of Acoustic Instruments,

 

is available at  Amazon.com: click New or Used.

 

 

 

 

Musical Mathematics is also available in more than 140 libraries throughout the US, and in Canada, Mexico, United Kingdom, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Turkey, Singapore, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Australia.

 

 

Musical Mathematics is the definitive tome for the adventurous musician. Integrating mathematics, music history, and hands-on experience, this volume serves as a comprehensive guide to the tunings and scales of acoustic instruments from around the world. Author, composer, and builder Cris Forster illuminates the mathematical principles of acoustic music, offering practical information and new discoveries about both traditional and innovative instruments. With this knowledge readers can improve, or begin to build, their own instruments inspired by Forster’s creations shown in the 16 color plates. For those ready to step outside musical conventions and those whose curiosity about the science of sound is never satisfied, Musical Mathematics is the map to a new musical world.

 

Published: Chronicle Books
Release Date: July 14, 2010
Hardcover, cloth case, and dust jacket
Sewn binding
8¾ x 11⅛ x 1.9 in
944 pp
16 color plates
249 figures
105 tables
4 bibliographies
8 appendices
Comprehensive index

 

Table of Contents  [PDF]

Look Inside!   [PDF]

Bibliography  [PDF]
Index  [PDF]

 

Seven Extensive Reviews  [PDF]
Thirteen Short Reviews  [PDF]

 

50+ Online PDF Citations

 

 

 

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July 17, 2008

 

KPFK, Los Angeles; the Global Village radio program, hosted by John Schneider, with excerpts from our new DVD A Voyage in Music, and CD Song of Myself: Intoned Poems of Walt Whitman, featuring original instruments and music by Cris Forster.

 

The KPFK Radio Program:

 

 

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Cris Forster with Chrysalis (1981)

Photo by Norman Seeff